Do you have your ducks in a row?  Last week was National Estate Planning Awareness Week and it got us to thinking about some of the most common estate planning mistakes people make.  We are sharing an article today on just that.

 

Common Estate Planning Mistakes

 

The most common way to transfer assets to your heirs is also the messiest: to have a will that is so out of date that it doesn’t relate to your property or estate, to have your records scattered all over the place, to have social media, banking and email accounts whose passwords only you can find—and basically to leave a big mess for others to clean up.

Is there a better way?

Recently, a group of estate planning experts were asked for their advice on a better process to handle the transfer of assets at your death, and to articulate common mistakes.  The list of mistakes included the following:

🏠 Not regularly reviewing documents.  What might have been a solid plan 15 or 20 years ago may not relate to your estate today.  The experts recommended a full review every three to five years, to ensure that trustees, executors, guardians, beneficiaries and healthcare agents are all up-to-date.  You might also consider creating a master document which lists all your social media and online accounts and passwords, so that your heirs can access them and close them down.

🏠 Using a will instead of a revocable trust.  This relates mostly to people who want to protect their privacy.  When assets pass to heirs via a will, the transfer creates a record that anybody can access and read.  A revocable trust can be titled in your name, and you can control the assets as you would with outright ownership, but the assets simply pass to your designated successor upon death.

🏠 Failing to fund the revocable trust.  You’ve set up the trust, but now you and your team of professionals have to transfer title to your properties out of your name and into the trust, with you as the trustee.  If you forget to do this, then the entire purpose of the trust is wasted.

🏠 Having assets titled in a way that conflicts with the will or trust.  You should always pay close attention to the beneficiary designations, because they—not your will—determine who will receive your IRA assets.  Meanwhile, assets (like a home) owned in joint tenancy with rights of survivorship will pass directly to the surviving joint tenant, no matter what the will or trust happens to say.

🏠 Not using the annual gift exemption.  People can gift $15,000 a year tax-free to heirs without affecting the value of their $11.4 million lifetime gift exemption.  (Note, the gift limits may change yearly).  That means a husband and wife with four children could theoretically gift the kids $120,000 a year tax-free.  That can reduce the size of a large estate potentially below the gift exemption threshold, and in states where there is an estate tax, it can help there as well.

🏠 Not understanding the generation-skipping transfer tax.  A husband and wife can each leave estate values of $11.4 million to any combination of individuals.  But if there’s anything left over, there’s a 40% federal estate tax on those additional assets left to heirs in the next generation (the children), and an additional 40% on assets left to the generation after that (the grandchildren).  Better to transfer $11.4 million out of the estate before death (tax-free, since this fills up the lifetime gift exemption) into a dynastic trust for the benefit of the grandchildren.  You can also transfer that annual $15,000 to grandchildren.

🏠 Not taking action because of the possibility of estate tax repeal.  Yes, Congress is discussing the total repeal of those estate taxes.  But what if there’s no action, or a compromise scuttles the estate tax provisions at the last minute?  Federal wealth transfer taxes have been enacted and repealed three times in U.S. history, so there’s no reason to imagine that even if there is a repeal, the repeal will last forever.  Meanwhile, dynastic trusts and other estate planning tactics provide tangible benefits even without the tax savings, including protecting assets from lawsuits and claims.

🏠 Leaving too much, too soon, to younger heirs.  Nothing can harm emerging adult values quite like realizing, as they start their productive careers, that they actually never need to work a day in their lives.  The alternative?  Create a trust controlled by a trusted family member or a corporate trust company until the beneficiaries reach a more mature stage of their lives, perhaps 30-35 years old.

Please remember that past performance may not be indicative of future results. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product made reference to directly or indirectly in this article will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance level(s), or be suitable for your portfolio. Moreover, you should not assume that any information or any corresponding discussions serves as the receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from Leading Edge Financial Planning personnel. The opinions expressed are those of Leading Edge Financial Planning as of 10/26/2019 and are subject to change at any time due to the changes in market or economic conditions.  This article was written by an guest author.

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